A Tour of the Ravelry Queue

A Tour of the Ravelry Queue

Organize your knitting wish list

 

In talking to a lot of knitters, I realize that I have spent a LOT more time futzing around with Ravelry's many features than a lot of other people. This is the first in a small series of guides to all the amazing stuff that you can use Ravelry for.
 
The queue is one of the easiest features to grasp. You see a pattern you think you might like… you queue it up. At the most basic level, it works just like a Netflix queue, except that obviously you don't have to knit everything in order!
 
Typically one of the first things someone does when they get a Ravelry account is that they queue up a ton of patterns, and then deflate. It's exhausting, being faced with all the things you want to knit! Worse is the situation you face a while down the road, when you discover that it tells you when you queued something. I just glanced at my queue and found something I queued in October, 2007! That's demoralizing.

 
This is where you want to enact a paradigm shift. I suggest treating your queue not as a list of things you want to knit, but as a library of patterns and inspiration. 
 
There are a few different ways to organize and sort your queue. I have found it most valuable to use tags. When I add an item to my queue, I add a tag for the item type (socks, hat, etc). That way when I'm looking for a sock pattern, I just click on a Sock tag and it shows me all the items I have queued with that tag.
 
You might also want to use tags for yarn weight (laceweight, bulky, etc), recipient (baby, child, man), or technique (cables, entrelac, double knitting).
 
When you add to your queue, you also have the opportunity to select a stash yarn. This is helpful for me, because I have all my yarn added to Ravelry. (More on that in a future post!) For example, I can go to my Stash page, click on the dark blue Reynolds Whiskey, and see that I have attached it to the queued project "Koolhaas." This is great because I often see a project and think "I could use my _____ for that." But then I forget. And when I find myself wanting to use that yarn, my mind goes blank.
 
Finally, the Notes section is very handy. I use this to remind myself to check the errata, look up other projects, or sigh wistfully about how unlikely it is I'll get around to knitting it.